Spirituality

“Jesus calls us; o’er the tumult of our life’s wild, restless sea, day by day his clear voice soundeth, saying, ‘Christian, follow me…'”

                                                                                         –Cecil Frances Alexander – Hymn 549

Holy Women, Holy Men: Celebrating the Saints

A new resource from the DSC05026 of the Episcopal Church brings a wide variety of new names to The Book of Occasional Services, enriching our common journey through the liturgical year. Many of these individuals are remembered during the weekly celebration of the Holy Eucharist (with laying on of hands for healing) on Wednesdays at Saint Mark’s each noon.

View “Holy Women, Holy Men: Celebrating the Saints” PDF here.

Click here to visit the “Holy Women, Holy Men” Blog.

Hall of Faith

Saint Mark’s Hall of Faith explores the heritage of God’s call to humanity as experienced through the Anglican tradition.Panel 2

Ten illuminated panels trace this story from its Old and New Testament origins to the history our tradition in England, America, Ohio and Upper Arlington. The series ends with the invocation of the Holy Spirit and leaves room for continued depictions of God’s work through and among us.

Click here download a PDF of Saint Mark’s Hall of Faith Meditative Guide.

Tour the Hall of Faith online.

"Sacred Stones, Sacred Story"

Picture2Spiritual themes help ground our Lenten journey each year encouraging “inner exploration” that can lead to outreach and action in Christ’s name.

Stations of the Cross

DSC03615For Centuries Pilgrims have found meaning walking in Christ’s final footsteps in Jerusalem. Saint Mark’s “Via Delarosa” are sixteen sketches by Columbus artist Paul Bourguignon found primarily around the Nave.

Every Good Friday these are the focus of “The Way of the Cross” from the Episcopal Book of Occasional Services.

Click here to download a PDF of Saint Mark’s Stations of the Cross Meditative Guide.

Chapel of Reconciliation

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This small contemplative space near the Narthex contains an original artwork by local artist Linda Fowler entitled “The Re-Birth of Dresden”. Also located here are reproductions classic icons (changing with the seasons of the liturgical year) such as Christ the Redeemer (glimpsed as the background of this page) or The Holy Trinity (left) by Andre Rublev.